DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

 


Philosophy of Service

 

 

I have devoted much of my personal and professional life towards service. Prior to coming to Quinnipiac, I have always felt a deep sense of purpose and altruism to serve, give back and share what I have gained through the profession, that has been very generous to me. Occupational therapy at its very core is about seeing the best in clients and maximizing their potential. It is through this humanistic principle that propels me to be an inclusive leader in my profession and be a servant and servant-leader to clients and the greater community.

 

My service and leadership philosophy has been influenced by notions of social justice and servant-leadership (coined by Robert Greenleaf in his essay,  "The Servant as Leader"). According to Greenleaf, servant-leadership begins with "a natural feeling to serve, then conscious choice brings one to aspire to lead." For me, that aspiration to serve and lead is borne out of a desire to empower others, to overcome their perceived or real disadvantages by helping them raise their capacity and competence, and become self-advocates.

 

In this segment of my portfolio, I hope to exemplify these beliefs and values about service at various levels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

 


Philosophy of Service

 

 

I have devoted much of my personal and professional life towards service. Prior to coming to Quinnipiac, I have always felt a deep sense of purpose and altruism to serve, give back and share what I have gained through the profession that has been very generous to me. Occupational therapy at its very core is about seeing the best in clients and maximizing their potential. It is this through this humanistic principle that propels me to be an inclusive leader in my profession and be a servant and servant-leader to clients and the greater community.

 

My service and leadership philosophy has been influenced by notions of social justice and servant-leadership (coined by Robert Greenleaf in his essay,  "The Servant as Leader"). According to Greenleaf, servant-leadership begins with "a natural feeling to serve, then conscious choice brings one to aspire to lead." For me, that aspiration to serve and lead is borne out of a desire to empower others to overcome their perceived or real disadvantages by helping them raise their capacity and competence and become self-advocates.

 

In this segment of my portfolio, I hope to exemplify these beliefs and values about service at various levels.

 

Shown above are depictions of service activities I provided to the pro-bono faculty clinic and Stroke Survivor's group at the University of the Philippines.

 

 

 

 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.